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Silvopasturing – managed grazing of livestock in forests – may help woodland management, say Cornell University educators. Forests offer increased feed options and shade for animals – and possibly tax benefits if silvopasturing is included in agricultural assessment programs.

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Considering Christmas tree farming? University of Kentucky Forestry Professor Deborah Brooks Hill suggests small plantings of 200 to 500 trees with intercrops.

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Resources for producing black walnut, chestnuts, elderberry, mushrooms and more.

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Poplar logsAgroforestry, according to Ron Smith of New Brunswick, is “managing trees and other stuff together.”  This down-to-earth definition works well for Smith and clients of his consulting company, VarFor Ltd., which he founded after working for the Canadian Forest Service for 27 years.  Smith discussed the great economic, environmental and social potential of agroforestry at the 10th North American Agroforestry Conference at Université Laval in Quebec in June 2007.

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Raimund Kohl, a Christmas tree grower in Germany, has been in touch with Len and Nancy Price, who grow Christmas trees in Newburgh, Maine, about using sheep to keep the grasses and weeds down around Christmas trees.

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Trees can shelter livestock – as well as farmsteads – from winter’s cold and summer’s heat. But … 1,200 trees in a pasture? That’s how many black locust trees Charles M. Feldhake is growing in a West Virginia pasture.

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Twelve years ago, my husband and I planted our first Christmas trees. In 1995, we started selling those trees, making a couple of hundred dollars that first year and a few hundred the next. Within a couple of years we hope to sell 200 each year and bring in about $3,000 each December. Those of you who grow fresh vegetables or other warm-season crops might be interested in generating such additional income in the off season.

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