Login | Sign Up
Articles

• Zombie Bees in Vermont
• Bumblebees Affected by Imidacloprid
• Diseases of Honeybees
• Reseeding Pastures to Support Bees

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |

The honeybee is the pollinator we most depend on, but other pollinators exist, and 4,000 species of feral (native) bees live in North America. Roughly one-third of these bees nest in small cavities or tunnels, such as hollow plant stems, borer tunnels and cracks between house shingles. Increased urbanization and modern building materials lacking cracks and crevices have decreased nesting opportunities for feral pollinators.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |

• Crops pollinated by insects contributed $29 billion to 2010 farm income
• Varroa mites studied

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
A combination of a fungus and a virus that proliferate in cool, damp weather and that affect bee guts may be linked to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Researchers found the virus and fungus in every killed colony they studied.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
Natural BeekeepingI recently returned to beekeeping after a 40-year hiatus. I kept two hives in the early 1970s in southern New England and moved those hives with me when I relocated to northern Maine. The bees caused me little trouble, and all went smoothly until a large bear broke his hibernation fast by dining on both my hives. In several late night visits, he totally trashed my hives, and I took it as a sign that beekeeping was going to be too difficult in Maine.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
Roughly one-third of the world’s crop plants depend on insects for pollination. On Maine farms and homesteads, with their emphasis on fruits and vegetables, pollinators are important for fruit set and crop yield – but environmental problems are reducing pollinator numbers. At the November 2009 Farmer-to-Farmer Conference, cosponsored by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and MOFGA, three speakers discussed establishing healthy honeybee colonies using natural and organic apicultural practices.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
Many people don’t know that they’ve ever seen Allendale, New Jersey, but the borough turns up all the time as a backdrop to movies and television shows because Allendale embodies an eastern suburb that’s tastefully affluent without being unduly ostentatious. Allendale, however, was until recently off limits to aviators with six legs: The borough was one of only two municipalities in northern New Jersey’s Bergen County that banned bees.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
This winter, according to The New York Times, beekeepers in 24 states have noticed that 30 to more than 70% of their bees have vanished, without leaving dead bodies in or around hives.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
The Pfeiffer Center will hold a workshop in Chestnut Ridge, N.Y., on April 28 and 29, 2006, for beekeepers. Participants will look at the bee colony as an organism and what it needs in order to further its health and vitality.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |

Got a question about honey bees? Now you can send your questions by computer to honey bee experts at the Agricultural Research Service’s Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Tucson, Arizona.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |

Copyright © 2017 Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association Terms Of Use Privacy Statement    Site by Planet Maine