Login | Sign Up
Season Extension
Search for "season extension" on MOFGA.net

Search for "season extension" on www.mofga.org

Search for "season extension" on MOFGApedia and www.mofga.org

Compost-pile "greenhouse"
A compost-pile-based "greenhouse" enables Adam Tomash and June Zellers to raise long-season, heat-loving vegetables in Maine. Photo by Adam Tomash and June Zellers for the Winter 2007-2008 Maine Organic Farmer & Gardener.


Articles

Speakers at MOFGA’s November 2012 Farmer to Farmer Conference addressed three crops for growing in high tunnels: raspberries, ginger and winter sprouting broccoli.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |

"Quick Hoop Half-Pipe"
This “Quick Hoop Half Pipe” displayed at the Common Ground Country Fair measured 6 by 10 feet and held 20 pepper plants. The same sort of structure could be used to produce greens into and through winter.

Eliot Coleman Improves on the Quick Hoop
Eliot Coleman has developed an improved method for supporting Quick Hoops structures the extend the growing season.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |

Cold hardy greensA Maine (northern) garden is always in transition. In my mind, I can visualize it as if through time-lapse photography. In spring we rapidly progress from young garlic and overwintered scallions pushing through the snow to neat rows of green sprouts. The rows fill out as summer progresses until the paths narrow and sometimes disappear. Late July is garlic harvest, which opens new ground, an empty palette for fall planting. Killing frost and garden cleanup empty much of the canvas, leaving the now sizable fall greens planting as the focal center of attention. Next come the caterpillar humps of low or high tunnels with overwintered greens.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |

Adam Montri of Michigan State University and two Maine growers spoke about hoophouses at MOFGA’s 2011 Spring Growth Conference. Montri, associated with the MSU student farm, helps small and midsized farms increase production and economic viability. He and his wife also have their own small farm.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
HoophousesAs crocuses and wild spring greens emerged in Maine, so did crops in an increasing number of ballooning structures: hoophouses. These structures that extend the growing season and even allow four-season farming are an increasingly important component of farm infrastructure.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
Toki Oshima drawingThe Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA), the University of New Hampshire and UMaine Cooperative Extension organized a meeting of growers at Paul Lorrain’s Sunset Farm Organics in Lyman, Maine, in December 2010 to tour the farm and talk about growing vegetables in winter. About 50 attended the tour and some 30 met afterward for a discussion facilitated by Eric Sideman, MOFGA’s organic crops specialist.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (1) RSS comment feed |
Eliot ColemanEliot Coleman has another great idea – one that will extend the growing season at far lower cost than the $1500 or so required for a hoop house. His plan, which he started experimenting with last year, involves planting pairs of 30-inch-wide beds of hardy crops on the first of October, covering them immediately with polyester row covers such as Reemay or Agribon (Coleman uses the 15-weight cover) supported by half-inch metal or PVC hoops; and then, in mid-November, setting greenhouse plastic over the row cover for added insulation.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
Eggplants in a cold frameEggplant, peppers, tomatoes and cucurbits are among our favorite crops. All require warm soil and a fairly long growing season, which means they need a protected, heated space in the cool Maine spring. We are gardeners growing for our own consumption and can’t justify the expense or complexity of a heated greenhouse – but we have found a way to produce these crops reliably year after year without a permanent greenhouse.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
Unity hoophouseSituated in the center of the Unity College campus in Unity, Maine, a rainbow-shaped swath of vegetable beds offers more than just produce for the college student center. This potpourri is designed to show students how food grows, from seed to seed.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
“We know that if we want to increase the economic bottom line for our farms with local sales, we have to produce what the local consumer wants, we have to extend our marketing season beyond summer and fall, and we have to make our products easily available for as much of the year as possible,” says Paula Day, project director of the Eat Smart Eat Local Project.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
On April 1, 2006, farmers and gardeners from Aroostook County and beyond gathered in Caribou for a workshop on winter vegetable production. Eliot Coleman from Four Season Farm and Marada Cook from Skylandia Farm were the presenters.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
Russell Libby and cold frameRuss Libby, MOFGA’s executive director, has been growing garden crops in cold frames – “one of my favorite tools” – for about 18 years. His first frames consisted of storm windows atop boards, he told several Small Farm Field Day participants at MOFGA’s Common Ground Education Center in Unity in July. “I’ve gotten more serious over time.”

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |
Harnois greenhouseChris Cavendish, who was MOFGA’s farmer-in-residence for the past two years, talked about his experiences growing crops in and out of a hoop house at MOFGA’s Small Farm Field Day in Unity on July 31, 2005, and highlighted some of his creative marketing techniques. Field Day participants offered input into management issues with hoop houses.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (1) RSS comment feed |

Eric Sideman & Eliot ColemanJudging from the crowd of well over 200 growers – many of them youthful – who attended MOFGA’s Spring Growth conference, year-round production could take off in Maine soon. The conference, “Year-Round Production and Marketing,” featured three farms where year-round production is or has been a reality, two where the practice is just taking root, and a talk on the physiology of plants that are stressed by cold.

[Read more...]

Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) RSS comment feed |

Copyright © 2017 Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association Terms Of Use Privacy Statement    Site by Planet Maine